Ring Size Guide

Finding your ring size is easy! Here are two methods for measuring your ring size in MM or Inches.

 

Method A: How to Measure Ring Finger Size

Step 1 - Get a non-stretchy string or paper about 6"(152MM) long and 1/4"(6.5MM) wide.
Step 2 - Wrap around the base of your finger. It has to fit snug, but not too tight.
Step 3 - Mark the point on the string/paper where it overlaps forming a circle.
Step 4 - Measure the length of the string/paper from the starting point to the mark.
Step 5 - To determine your ring size in all countries open our Ring Size Conversion Chart for MM or Inches.

Ring finger measuring tips:
If you are between sizes, order a larger size. Make sure your finger is at a normal body temperature -- fingers can shrink or expand when cold or hot. If your knuckle is much larger than your finger’s base, take two separate measurements and choose a size in between. You want a ring to fit over your knuckle, but not be too loose or it will shift around.

Method B: How to Measure an Existing Ring

Download and print our Printable Ring Sizer. Printer Needed.

 

 Global Ring Sizing Systems


 International Ring Size Conversion Chart

 

Tip: When measuring your finger, your measurements need to be a 100% accurate as even a fraction of a millimeter can make a difference
There are several systems for indicating a rings size used around the world:

In the United States, Canada and Mexico, for indicating a rings size uses a numerical measure, for whole and half rings sizes. An increase of a full ring size is an increase of 0.032 inch (0.8128 mm) in diameter, or roughly 1/10 inch in inside circumference.

In United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Ireland, the ring sizes are specified using an alphabetical letters, for full and half ring sizes

In Japan, India, South America and China, ring sizes are specified using a numerical measure, that only has whole size rings, and does not have direct correlation with diameter or circumference.

In Italy, Spain, Netherlands, and Switzerland, ring sizes are specified as the circumference minus 40mm. A 50 ISO was a 10 in Switzerland.

In France and Germany the numbers of each sizesimply translates to the circumference of the inside of the ring in millimeters. So a size 40 would mean the inside circumference of a ring is also 40 mm.

 

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